President Johnson’s Boyhood Home to be Partially Closed for Preservation Work

Jun 17, 2015

Release Date: June 17, 2015

Contact: Dave Schafer, [email protected] 830-868-7128 ext. 235

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Johnson City, Texas – Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park has announced that President Johnson’s boyhood home in Johnson City will be partially closed for public tours for approximately ten weeks, beginning on Monday, July 13 and ending on about Friday, September 25, 2015. The park is closing parts of the home in order to complete necessary preservation work. During the closure window frames, wood siding, and porch flooring will be replaced in the house. Completion of this project will require the partial removal of some historic furnishings and periodic altering of the tour route for the public tours. Due to the nature of the preservation process, there may be times the home will need to be closed completely to the public. Please check the park’s website at www.nps.gov/lyjo for updates.

Lyndon Johnson moved into the home in Johnson City at age five in 1913. He lived in the house through most of his childhood. In 1969 the house came into the national park system. In the early 1970s the National Park Service restored and furnished the house much as it would have appeared in the 1920s when the future president was a teenager.

All other park facilities will be open to the public during this time including the Johnson Settlement and the park visitor center in Johnson City, and the LBJ Ranch and the Texas White House near Stonewall.

Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park is open seven days a week from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. For more information call 830-868-7128 ext. 231 or 244, or visit www.nps.gov/lyjo and www.facebook.com/LBJohnsonNPS.

More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 406 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Visit us at www.nps.gov, on Facebook www.facebook.com/nationalparkservice, Twitter www.twitter.com/natlparkservice, and YouTube www.youtube.com/nationalparkservice.