Educator Summer Webinar Series

Jul 29, 2020

Calling all educators! Are you looking for professional development opportunities and support with your curriculum needs? Join the LBJ Presidential Library for our educator summer webinar series featuring scholars and education specialists. 

All webinars are free of charge, with advanced registration required. Registered educators will receive access to the event, a recording of the program, and resources related to the session. This webinar series is open to classroom teachers, preservice teachers, college professors, informal educators, and homeschool educators.

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Schedule

July

Tuesday, July 7, 10:30-11:30 a.m. CDT

Session 1: “We who believe in freedom cannot rest”: Black women and critical citizenship with Dr. Amanda E. Vickery

This session will focus on exploring Black women’s activism through a framework of Black Feminist Critical Patriotism (BFCP) that demonstrates the unique ways in which Black women engaged in civic activism.

About Our Speaker
Amanda E. Vickery is an Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education and Anti-Racist Education at the University of North Texas. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in elementary social studies methods. Her research focuses on how Black women teachers utilize experiential and community knowledge to reconceptualize the construct of citizenship. Additionally, she explores Black women as critical citizens within the U.S. civic narrative. Her scholarship has been published in Theory and Research in Social Education, Urban Education, Race, Ethnicity and Education, Curriculum Inquiry, Journal of Social Studies Research, Multicultural Perspectives, Gender and Education, The High School Journal, Social Studies Research and Practice, and The International Journal of Multicultural Education. Dr. Vickery is active in the social studies community serving on the Executive Board of the College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).

 

Thursday, July 9, 10:30-11:30 a.m. CDT

Session 7: Virtual Vietnam: Exploring the War Through Digital Resources with Sheila Mehta and Mallory Lineberger

This session examines instructional tools through the DocsTeach platform as well as lesson opportunities and primary source document use when teaching the Vietnam conflict. Participants will be given a multitude of resources provided by the LBJ Presidential Library to use in the traditional or virtual classroom.

 

Tuesday, July 14, 10:30-11:30 a.m. CDT

Session 9: LBJ as President with Dr. H.W. Brands

Lyndon Johnson was the greatest legislator-in-chief to occupy the White House, and perhaps the worst commander-in-chief. The two aspects of his presidency were closely connected, and they illuminate the challenges faced by every president.

About Our Speaker
H.W. Brands was born in Oregon, went to college in California, sold cutlery across the American West and earned graduate degrees in mathematics and history in Oregon and Texas. ~ He taught at Vanderbilt University and Texas A&M University before joining the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, where he holds the Jack S. Blanton Sr. Chair in History. He teaches history and writing to graduate students and undergraduates. ~ He writes on American history and politics. Several of his books have been bestsellers; two, Traitor to His Class and The First American, were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize.

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Thursday, July 16, 10:30-11:30 a.m. CDT

Session 10: Whitney Hayne

Beyond the Oval Office: Using White House History in Your Classroom

Explore the history of the Executive Mansion and surrounding neighborhood with the White House Historical Association. Gain primary sources and online tools to teach these rich and complex stories with your students.

About Our Speaker
Whitney Hayne is the Director of Education at the White House Historical Association. She joined the Association in 2016. Prior to WHHA, she worked at the Kentucky Historical Society implementing inquiry based programs for teachers and students.

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Tuesday, July 21, 10:30-11:30 a.m. CDT

Session 11: Johnson and Civil Rights Leadership in the African American Imagination with Dr. Sharron Wilkins Conrad

When asked which of the five most recent presidents achieved the most for civil rights, black respondents to a 1966 Harris Poll named John Kennedy over Lyndon Johnson by fifty-four percentage points. This, even though President Johnson had signed into law the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act--the most significant civil rights legislation of the twentieth century--in the previous two years. The disconnect between LBJ's accomplishments and the frosty response he received in the poll points to the deep mistrust Johnson generated in the black community. When Jet magazine's Simeon Booker's warned a month after Johnson's swearing-in that, "the odds are against him in our community," he could not have been more prescient. This presentation examines the genesis of that mistrust and why it lingers more than fifty years later.

About Our Speaker
Sharron Wilkins Conrad is a postdoctoral fellow at Southern Methodist University’s Center for Presidential History. Her research interests include the Civil Rights Movement, public history, and the presidencies of John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson. Her book, The Trinity: John Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and Their Civil Rights Legacies in African American Imagination, traces the process by which Kennedy emerged as a civil rights hero for many African Americans while Johnson’s civil rights leadership has been viewed more skeptically, despite the fact that he fought for and signed into law historic civil rights legislation. Dr. Conrad received her PhD in Humanities from The University of Texas at Dallas in 2019. She holds a BA in History and Anthropology from Penn State University and a MA in Public History from Howard University. Previously, she served as Director of Education and Public Programs at The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza.

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Thursday, July 23, 10:30-11:30 a.m. CDT

Session 12: "We Shall Overcome: The Fight for Voting Rights," with Mallory Lineberger

Join the LBJ Library education department for the launch of a new, interactive online activity, "We Shall Overcome: The Fight for Voting Rights," ideal for remote or blended learning environments.

Following the journey for voting rights, students will evaluate the actions taken by President Johnson and civil rights activists to pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The activity is set up with a series of clues leading to primary and secondary sources, which must be examined and analyzed to unlock a secret code. During the journey, students will hear from John Lewis, George Wallace, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and President Johnson. why it lingers more than fifty years later.

About Our Speaker
Mallory Lineberger is an education specialist at the LBJ Presidential Library, where she enjoys creating and leading classroom activities for school groups as well as developing resources for educators. After studying history at Texas A&M University, Mallory earned a graduate degree in education from the University of North Texas in order to begin her career as a high school history teacher. In addition to her time in the classroom, Mallory's museum experience includes two years guiding tours in the museums of Paris, as well as working in museum education at the Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin, Texas.

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Tuesday, July 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m. CDT

Session 13: Danielle McGuireThe Radical Roots of the Montgomery Bus Boycott—a women’s movement for bodily integrity.

Black women's protests against sexual assault and interracial rape fueled civil rights campaigns throughout the South beginning during WWII and continuing through the Black Power movement. The Montgomery bus boycott was the baptism, not the birth of that struggle.

About Our Speaker
Danielle McGuire is the author of At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape and Resistance-a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power (Knopf), which won the Frederick Jackson Turner Award and the Lillian Smith Book Award. She is the recipient of the Lerner Scott Prize for best dissertation in women’s history. Her Journal of American History article, “It was Like We Were All Raped: Sexualized Violence, Community Mobilization and the African American Freedom Struggle,” won the A. Elizabeth Taylor Prize for best essay in southern women’s history and was reprinted in the Best Essays in American History. She is also the editor, with John Dittmer, of Freedom Rights: New Perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement. McGuire is a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians and has appeared on PBS, CNN, MSNBC, Headline News, National Public Radio, BookTV, and dozens of radio stations throughout the United States.

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Thursday, July 30, 10:30-11:30 a.m. CDT

Session 14: The 2020 Election & a Nation in Crisis with Dr. Victoria DeFrancesco Soto.

We enter the 2020 Presidential race in the midst of a Global Pandemic and Civil Rights Crisis. This session provides an overview of the election, starting with a review of “normal” presidential election dynamics and zooming out to put the 2020 election in the context of our current moment.

About Our Speaker
Victoria is the Assistant Dean of Civic Engagement at the Lyndon Baines Johnson School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas where she was selected as one of the University’s Game Changing faculty. Named one of the top 12 scholars in the country by Diverse magazine Victoria previously taught at Northwestern University and Rutgers and received her Ph.D. in political science from Duke University. Victoria’s social scientific areas of expertise include immigration, Latinos, women, racial and ethnic minority politics, as well as political psychology. Underlying all of her research interests is the intersection of social group identity and political participation.

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For more information or questions, contact [email protected].

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Contact Us

Sarah McCracken
Director of Public Programs
LBJ Presidential Library
2313 Red River St.
Austin, TX 78705
[email protected]


Deborah Arronge
Membership Manager

LBJ Presidential Library
[email protected]


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